Gabapentin is not Suitable for Children under 6 Years of Age

Gabapentin is not suitable for children under 6 years of age but, if it has been prescribed for a child who is older than this, check the label carefully to make sure you are giving the correct dose.

Gabapentin is FDA approved as an anti-convulsant for the treatment of Epilepsy and seizures resulting from other disorders. It is used to treat neuralgia and neuropathy, both of which are syptoms of many different diseases; such as, diabetic neuropathy or Shingles related neuralgia, among other disorders like fibromyalgia, as well as, physical trauma.

Dr.s also prescribe it for general anxiety and panic disorders, instead of more addicting benzodiazepines. and very recently it has been tried as a treatment for major depression and mood disorders.

It can help potentiate the efficacy of analgesic drugs, mostly opiate/opioid medications. It also helps mitigate the unpleasant side effects of withdrawal from opiates during titration and cessation of those drugs.  It can treat Restless Leg Syndrome (RLS).

It is not a controlled substance in the United States, and has a very low abuse potential, because it’s efficacy is dose dependent, with limited bioavailability and therefore, the higher the dose the less effective it is. It’s a gabapentinoid and it’s molecular structure is similar to that of GABA , making it a GABA analog, and it works by inhibiting Voltage-dependent Calcium channels (VDCC), it often is thought of as a GABA agonist, like benzodiazepines, but that is incorrect.

Take gabapentin exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Follow all directions on your prescription label. Do not take this medicine in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

The Horizant brand of gabapentin should not be taken during the day.  For best results, take Horizant with food at about 5:00 in the evening.

Both Gralise and Horizant should be taken with food. Neurontin can be taken with or without food.

If you break a Neurontin tablet and take one half of it, take the other half at your next dose. Any tablet that has been broken should be used as soon as possible or within a few days.

Measure liquid medicine with a special dose-measuring spoon or medicine cup. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

If your doctor changes your brand, strength, or type of gabapentin, your dosage needs may change. Ask your pharmacist if you have any questions about the new brand you receive at the pharmacy.

Do not stop using gabapentin suddenly, even if you feel fine. Stopping suddenly may cause increased seizures. Follow your doctor’s instructions about tapering your dose.

Wear a medical alert tag or carry an ID card stating that you take gabapentin. Any medical care provider who treats you should know that you take seizure medication.

This medication can cause you to have a false positive urine protein screening test. If you provide a urine sample for testing, tell the laboratory staff that you are taking gabapentin.

Store at room temperature away from light and moisture.

  • Before starting this treatment, read the manufacturer’s printed information leaflet from inside the pack. The leaflet will give you more information about gabapentin and any possible side-effects from taking it.
  • Take gabapentin exactly as your doctor has told you to. You will be advised to take a small dose when you first start taking gabapentin and then to increase your doses over a few days as your body gets used to it. Your doctor or pharmacist will explain this to you and your dose will also be on the label of your pack.
  • Gabapentin is not suitable for children under 6 years of age but, if it has been prescribed for a child who is older than this, check the label carefully to make sure you are giving the correct dose.
  • You can take gabapentin before or after meals. Swallow the tablets/capsules with a drink of water.
  • Once you are taking a regular amount of gabapentin, try to take your doses at the same times each day. This will help you to avoid missing any of your doses.
  • If you do forget to take a dose, take it as soon as you remember, but do not take two doses together to make up for a forgotten dose.
  • If you need to take an antacid or indigestion remedy, do not take it during the two hours before and the two hours after you take gabapentin. This is because they interfere with the way gabapentin works.

Store the liquid medicine in the refrigerator. Do not freeze.

Controlled Substance May Causes Erectile Dysfunction

Impotence means that a man’s penis doesn’t get hard enough to have sexual intercourse. The man cannot get or maintain an erection. The medical term is erectile dysfunction (ED).

ED is not the same as premature ejaculation.

The major causes of ED include:

  • Vascular (blood vessel) disease — Erections happen when blood collects in the shaft of the penis. Vascular disease can limit the amount of blood flowing to or staying in the penis. Both can result in problems with erections.
  • Vascular disease is the most common medical cause of impotence.
  • Nerve damage — Nerves must be working normally for a man to get and keep an erection. Nerves can be damaged by diabetes, multiple sclerosis, prostate surgery or damage to the spinal cord.
  • Psychological factors — Psychological issues such as depression, anxiety, guilt or fear can sometimes cause sexual problems. At one time, these factors were thought to be the major cause of impotence. Doctors now know that physical factors cause impotence in most men with the problem. However, embarrassment or “performance anxiety” can make a physical problem worse.
  • Medications — Many medications cause problems with sexual function. These include drugs for high blood pressure, depression, heart disease and prostate cancer.
  • Hormonal problems — Abnormal levels of certain hormones can interfere with erections and sex drive. Hormonal problems, such as a low testosterone level, are an uncommon cause of impotence.

Controlled Substance or drugs that can cause or lead to ED include these recreational and frequently abused drugs:

  • Alcohol.
  • Amphetamines.
  • Barbiturates.
  • Cocaine.
  • Marijuana.
  • Methadone.
  • Nicotine.
  • Opiates.

Aside from the well-known complications that the use and abuse of these drugs can cause, ED is not often mentioned. However, use of these drugs is a risk factor for ED. These drugs not only affect and often times slow down the central nervous system, but can also cause serious damage to the blood vessels, leading to permanent ED.